Stations

We adore you, O Christ, and we bless you
because, by your holy cross, you have redeemed the world.

1st: Jesus is condemned to death

You suffered for us, O blessed Jesus.  It was our sins that condemned you to death.  Grant that we may obtain your mercy and pardon through repentance.

             

               

2nd: Jesus carries his cross

O Jesus, grant us the ability to embrace the difficulties of our life.
Make us ever ready to take up our cross and follow you.

               

               

3rd: Jesus falls the first time

O Jesus, you bore the heavy burden of the cross for our sins.
May your suffering make us watchful and keep us from sin.

               

             

4th: Jesus meets his mother

O Jesus, have compassion on us and give us a share in Mary’s intercession.
O Mary intercede for us that we may find our way back to God.

               

               

5th: Simon helps carry the cross

O Lord Jesus, may it be our privilege to bear our cross.
May we rejoice if we should be counted worthy to suffer for your name’s sake.

               

               

6th: Veronica wipes the face of Jesus

O Jesus, may the thought of your suffering move us with deep compassion.
Kindle in our hearts a more fervent love for you.
May your image be engraved in our minds until we are completely yours.

               

               

7th: Jesus falls the second time

O Jesus, how often have you mourned us by our repeated falls into sin.
May we choose not to offend you.

               

               

8th: Jesus consoles the women

O Jesus, we mourn for you and for ourselves
Teach us to be more like you.

               

               

9th: Jesus falls the third time

O Jesus, we ask that you pardon our frequent relapses into sin.
May the thought of your suffering help us be our best.

               

               

10th: Jesus is stripped of his garments

O Jesus, strip us of all false esteem, conceit, and pride and make us humble
so that we can share your glory in the life to come.

               

               

11th: Jesus is nailed to the cross

O Jesus, nailed to the cross, fasten our hearts to the cross
so that we may be united with you.

               

               

12th: Jesus dies on the cross

O Jesus, we devoutly embrace your saving cross on which you died
so that we may have eternal life.
We honor your cross and lovingly accept our own.

               

               

13th: Jesus is taken down from the cross

O Mary, your grief must have been great as your son was put to death.
By his death and resurrection we have become children in Christ.
Help us be like your son, Jesus.

               

               

14th: Jesus is laid in the tomb

Lord, your suffering is over.  Sin, death, and hell have been conquered.
Be the King of my heart.  I surrender myself to your holy will.
I am yours.  May your kingdom come.

               

               

We adore you, O Christ, and we bless you
because, by your holy cross, you have redeemed the world.

Contact information

Stations prayers are based on Reflections on the Stations of the Cross (B-8/15) from the St. Jude Shrine, 512 West Saratoga Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1805.

Pictured stations: (top) St. Cecilia (Los Fresnos, TX), Our Lady of Good Counsel (Brownsville, TX), St. Cecilia (Wisconsin Dells); (bottom) St. Joseph (Sunnyside, WA), St. Luke (Brownsville, TX), and St. Jude Thaddeus (Pharr, TX), respectively.

Prayers

Accept today, Lord, my humble and contrite heart.  Forgive my actions that have caused pain to others.  Show me the way forward that I might act in accordance with your divine and awesome love in all things great and small.  To the praise and glory of your name always, now, and forever.  Amen (Pittsburg Theological Seminary [PTS]).

Almighty God, soften my heart and let me see the extent to which I have sinned against your holiness and the creatures you love.  Though I can only see pain ahead for now, I accept your judgment and pray that, in your wrath, you will remember mercy.  Amen (PTS).

Dear God, as we follow Jesus and commit ourselves afresh to living for him in the world, we pray not only for ourselves and others who trust in Jesus— we ask that you will also hear our prayers in behalf of people who do not yet know him.  May we share and show God’s love to all whom you bring our way.  Amen (PTS).

God, devoted companion, guide us as we enter into this sacred season.  Grace us with prayerful resolve so that this might be a fruitful time for each of us, a time of true repentance, reflection, and self-discipline.  May these forty days be for us a pilgrimage into your heart and into deeper solidarity with our sisters and brothers within the human family.  We ask this in your most holy name.  Amen (Larry Livingston from Unbound).

God, your love for us is deep and mysterious.  In this time of anxiety, bless us with the strength and the wisdom to place our trust in you.  As your son, Jesus, prayed for resolve in the garden, so may we have the resolve to endure our current trials.  As he sacrificed his life out of love for us, may we dedicate our own sacrifices, big and small, to the care of our world, especially those most in need.  We ask this in your holy name.  Amen (Livingston).

God, help us to know that you do not forsake us, that your steadfast love, grace, and mercy are always present in our lives.  Let us rejoice and say “God is good” even when to our prayer we do not get the answer we so desperately want.  Amen (PTS).

God of hope, guide us this Lenten season and beyond to look closer, so that we may see the potential of marginalized people.  Strengthen us to walk with those dismissed because of gender, ethnicity, race, religion, age, disability, poverty, or other circumstances.  Help us love, cherish, and believe in them the way you love, cherish, and believe in all your children.  We ask this in your holy name.  Amen (Loretta Shea Kline).

Gracious and compassionate God, be with us in our lament.  Turn our hearts and our most inmost parts toward seeing anew, toward the suffering that we ourselves experience in this moment, and toward the suffering that others experience because of our shared rebellion.  Bring us this day into the grace of knowing that our suffering is that of others also, that our lament is their lament.  And bring us into the grace of praying that our understanding may become full and of praying for a fullness of understanding that all may share.  Amen (PTS).

Gracious God, in the midst of busy contemporary life, we pause to listen prayerfully and expectantly to the ancient voice of the psalmist, as across the centuries it speaks to us of your gift of spiritual assurance in our times of uncertainty.  We offer our profound gratitude for your promises given.  In Christ’s name we pray.  Amen (PTS).

Holy God, on this Lenten journey we feel, at times, as though your face is hidden from us.  Speak love to us.  Gather us back.  Show us your face. Remind us that your love carries us, no matter how interesting the times in which we are living.  Amen (PTS).

Jesus, help us to follow you as you walk the way of the cross.  May we not lose heart in the face of suffering.  Amen (Franciscan Media [FM]).

Jesus, keep us faithful to you. When our faith is tested, may we not betray your trust.  May we always be your servants, even in times of suffering.  Amen (FM).

Jesus, may we put faith in you and in the works you do in fulfillment of the Father’s will.  May we help others come to believe in you.  Amen (FM).

Jesus, lifted up on the cross, draw us to yourself.  As we sign ourselves with your cross, remind us that we belong to you.  Amen (FM).

Jesus, may our attitude be yours.  Help us to let go of all that keeps us from life with you.  May today for us be a day of salvation.  Amen (FM).

Jesus, we stand with Mary at the foot of your cross.  Entrust us to her care.  May she ever lead us to you in the heart of the church.  Amen (FM).

Most gracious and loving God, on the night of Jesus’s birth, his cry burst into song and changed history.  As he grew, his teachings became life-changing songs of love.  When he was tried, crucified, and then died, the world thought his song was silenced.  His resurrection brought forth a glorious song of unending love.  Help us never to forget that, if Christ’s song is to continue, we must do the singing.  May we sing a jubilant song of faith, hope, love, and justice on earth as it is in heaven.  In Christ we pray, amen (PTS).

O Lord Jesus Christ, you died to save us.  You stretched your arms on the cross to embrace the world and gather us as your people in the church.  We rejoice!  May we share our lives with others who love you— and with the world you love so deeply.  Amen (PTS).

O Lord of infinite forgiveness and love, rouse our hearts to see the holy in the hustle and bustle, to feel the peace in the noise and chaos, and to experience your grace anew.  Amen (PTS).

Our heavenly Father, you have ordered the universe with physical laws that control the stars above and the world below.  You have given us life and the freedom to choose our path.  Help us to avoid the modern-day plagues that tempt us daily; help us discover the life-giving universal laws found in your word.  Light the way with your love….  Amen (PTS).

Suffering Lord, may we walk with you on the way of the cross.  Strengthen us to let go of selfish ambition and join you in serving others.  Amen (FM).

When our enemies surround us and plot against us, Lord, rescue us from their clutches and defend us from harm.  Be our strength and our salvation.  Amen (FM).

March 4, 2020

Lent opens with a piercing sound, that of a trumpet that does not please the ears, but instead proclaims a fast.  It is a loud sound that seeks to slow down our life, which is so fast-paced yet often directionless.  It is a summons to stop— a halt!— to focus on what is essential, to fast from the unnecessary things that distract us.  It is a wake-up call for the soul (Pope Francis).

March 5, 2020

“We could not go to Calvary to offer ourselves with him and thus share in the fruits of his sacrifice, so Jesus brought Calvary to us” (Fr. Lawrence G. Lovasik in The Basic Book of the Eucharist).

March 8, 2020

“Faith isn’t primarily about rituals and rules, but about walking with God” (Alice Camille, We Journey Together, 2020, p. 13).

March 22, 2020

In times such as these, O God, we wait in Lenten apprehension and hope, longing for the preservation of humanity, the restoration of your creation, and the redemption of both through the sustaining and transforming presence of your Holy Spirit in our hearts and in our world (PTS).

March 26, 2020

We are not to be without pain.  Pain is Jesus suffering in us, but we are to look to him for strength and courage.  We are to learn this ability to shoulder our cross by gazing at him and being gentle and humble in heart (Mother Angelica in Suffering and Burnout).

March 27, 2020

Love and sacrifice are not the same thing, but they are inseparable.  To think of Christ and to think of the cross is not the same thing, but the association is so close that the implication is immediate.  Where love has been preached without sacrifice, it has not led to love but to license (Hubert Van Zeller in How to Find God).

April 12, 2020

Our Lord and our God, on this day when we celebrate your resurrection, help us to come to understand that Easter is much more than a one-day celebration each year.  Help all of us to know and understand ourselves as an “image of You.”  And empower us to live out our daily lives as your image to our family, friends, neighbors, strangers, and yes, even, our enemies.  Amen (PTS).

May 14, 2020

By dying on the cross for us, Jesus showed to what lengths God would go in his love for man; by dying for the glory of the Father, he expressed the depth of the love of man for God.  The cross is the supreme symbol of this love (Luis M. Martinez in True Devotion to the Holy Spirit).

June 22, 2020

“The great secret of a fervent life is to take as our ideal the maxim: Act on all occasions as our Lord would have acted had he been in our place” (Raoul Plus, SJ, in How To Pray Always).

July 28, 2020

“If the Passion of Christ is a way of pain, it is also a path of hope leading to certain victory” (Blessed Alvaro del Portillo).

Links of interest…  Aventine meditations…  Earthbeat…  Easter/Lent (meditations)…  Forty days at the foot of the cross…  Franciscan Media: Lent with the saints…  Holy Week: 1st four days / Triduum…  Lent’s reward…  Loving with all our being…  Meditations for Lent…  Pittsburgh Theological Seminary: Advent & Lent devotionals & archive…  Prayer before the crucifix…  Praying Lent…  Resurrection…  St. Jude Shrine…  Stations of the Cross: about / devotion / fish eaters / for families / for kids / how to do / origin / prayers / printables  / puppet show / significance / unique chant / way of the cross / what are…  Via Crucis at the Colosseum with Pope Francis

WP posts…  Bearing one’s crosses…  Capuchin church stations…  Christ’s passion…    Concrete abstraction…  For all time…  Full circle…  God’s lovely gifts…  Growing pains…  Lady of sorrows…  Lenten meditations…  Lenten reflections…  Lenten resources…  Lingering memory…  Pilgrim’s journey…  Prayerful ways…  Quiet prayer time…  Sioux chapel stations…  Simple yet profound…  Sorrowful redemption

Unsmiling disbelief

main altar in church

Sunday evening (bilingual) Mass at St. Cecilia’s in Los Fresnos, TX was— how do I put this delicately— interesting and unlike anything Steven and I had ever experienced before.  While the setting was lovely and inviting with lots of concrete benches in the churchyard and parishioners were cordial and glad to see visitors, the pastor was such an outlier that we didn’t know whether to be amused or concerned.

After Mass, I googled the priest on my tablet the moment we got back to our vehicle.  I wanted to understand why we’d been subjected to such unorthodox behavior during Mass.  The man had read the day’s written gospel interspersed with his own personal statements!  Who does that?

To make matters worse, the homily was tasteless and totally bizarre.  Was the priest having an off day?  Was he drunk?  Was he high?  Was this his usual comportment— or just theatrics for effect?  We’d never seen or heard anything like it!

Sitting on the fifth pew on the left before the ambo I sat there in unsmiling disbelief as my mind wandered momentarily.  What would Bishop Danny say?  Does he know?  Has anyone checked on the parish?  Don’t priests get evaluated the way teachers do?  Or is any priest better than none?  I missed Fr. George’s power-packed homily back home, but I’d appreciate him that much more soon enough.

Having visited a plethora of sacred spaces in my lifetime, I’ve seen and heard things that make me wonder how good people put up with what they face day in and day out within their parishes.  And, while I’ve never asked about church dynamics (because it’s not my place to do so), I’ve been told by some that they’ve “prayed for years” for a down-to-earth, welcoming priest instead of one who resents his assignment.  But we’ve also delighted in beautiful celebrations that make us want to belong.

So, except for mentally preparing for the photo opportunities— statues, stained-glass windows, stations of the cross— preconceived notions and expectations aren’t really part of the plan.  We’re usually so eager to experience a new church community that we count the days until our first visit.

Like crushing on a first love, we look ahead to that wonderful, memorable experience— the church, the people, the priest— that will remain with us going forward.  That said, St. Cecilia’s facebook page has positive comments.  Some parishioners love their church, so we’ll keep an open mind when we attend Mass in English next time.

          

                 

                 

                 

       

   

          

          

          

   

           

Prayer

Light of the World, enlighten our minds with wisdom and enkindle our hearts with compassion.  Let our moments of blindness be brief and instructive, so that we may never truly lose vision but, rather, gain insight as we seek to serve you in our brothers and sisters.  We ask this in your most holy name.  Amen (Larry Livingston from Unbound).

O glorious St. Cecilia, virgin and martyr, you won the martyr’s crown without renouncing your love for Jesus, the delight of your soul.  We ask that you help us to be faithful in our love for Jesus so that, in the communion of the saints, we may praise him twice in our song of rejoicing for the blood that he shed which gave us the grace to accomplish his will on earth.  Amen.

Quote

Arise, soldiers of Christ!  Throw away the works of darkness and put on the armor of light (St. Cecilia)

Links of interest…  St. Cecilia: life / miracles / Nov 22 / novena (more) / patron of music / prayers (more) / quotes / story…  Help my unbelief…  St. Cecilia Church: facebook / Mass times

WP posts…  Afternoon Mass…  Angels keeping watch…  Full circle…  Mary’s Immaculate Heart…  Our Lady Star…  St. Benedict’s

Afternoon Mass

Year before last we attended four o’clock Mass at Our Lady of Sorrows in McAllen, TX for the very first time and— were we ever surprised to find a smiling Santo Niño de Cebú waiting for us in the crying room as I took photos afterwards!

November 18, 2017

          

          

         

         

                 

           

          

     

October 20, 2018

          

          

          

               

     

December 15, 2018

          

          

     

          

       

January 26, 2019

          

              

July 14, 2019

     

December 8, 2019

          

       

         

Prayer from the Association of the Miraculous Medal

Our mother of sorrows, with strength from above you stood by the cross, sharing in the sufferings of Jesus, and with tender care you bore him in your arms, mourning and weeping.

We praise you for your faith, which accepted the life God planned for you.  We praise you for your hope, which trusted that God would do great things in you.  We praise you for your love in bearing with Jesus the sorrows of his passion.

Holy Mary, may we follow your example, and stand by all your children who need comfort and love.

Mother of God, stand by us in our trials and care for us in our many needs.  Pray for us now and at the hour of our death.  Amen.

Quote

“The saints assure us that turning to the Lord in our sorrows and placing our hopes in him can give us strength here and now and help prepare us for a future of new life and joy” (Fr. Joseph Esper in More Saintly Solutions).

Links of interest…  Beholding Our Mother…  Develop a devotion to Our Lady of Sorrows…  Finding comfort…  Jorrowful mysteries…  Mourning with the sorrowful mother…  OLS in McAllen: bulletins / homilies / website…  Our Lady of Sorrows: about / beautiful prayer / chaplet / devotion (more) / feast (Sept. 15) / meditations / mysteries / novena / prayers / quotes / rosary / scriptures / seven prayers…  Pietà: about (more) / chapel / lesson about unexpected grace / statueSeven sorrows rosary: Solace for suffering souls…  Seven sorrows, seven promises, & Fatima’s connection…  Stabat Mater: about / hymn / liturgical sequence / seven sorrows

WP posts…  At long last…  Bearing one’s crosses…  Christ’s sacred heart  Faces of Mary…  Fatima prayers…  God’s lovely gifts…  Lady of sorrows…  Lingering memory…  My Franciscan Crown…  Niño de Cebú…  Repeated prayers…  Santo Niño…  St. Jude chapel  St. Monica…  Sweet Jesus…  Unbounded joy

Naturally engaging

Early Sunday morning, May 12, 2019, the Carnival Legend docked in Ketchikan, Alaska; so we right away took a taxi to Holy Name Church several blocks away.

          

     

         

     

    

Mary before Mass

A woman spoke to me as I photographed the stained-glass windows in the vestibule.

Those windows are from the old church that was nearer the ship docks in the downtown area.  Of course, the parish outgrew it.  So, in the sixties, the school was built first.  Mass was held at the school until the church was dedicated in 1985.

“This worked out better, then?” I asked.

Yes, the downtown area was getting congested, and there was no room to expand.  It was very limited.  I didn’t live here then.  I moved here in 1974 and attended Mass at the school until the church was built.  The parish hall was finished about ten years later, and now the facility’s complete.

We introduced ourselves and shared bits and pieces of our respective journeys in faith before Mary continued.

Parishioners at Holy Name Church are very nice.  They transport visitors to and from the docks.  After Mass there are a couple of vans that take visitors back to their ships.  You may have to wait a little bit depending on the number of people who need rides, but they’ll take you.  Also, parishioners will offer to take you if they’re going that way.

“Thank you!  You’re angels!”

“God bless you!” Mary said before adding a final note: The archbishop from the Diocese of Juneau had been in town since Friday.  “Confirmations this weekend— and Mother’s Day— so all kinds of special things are happening today.”

I thanked Mary and wished her well; and she, in turn, wished us safe travels.

I returned to our pew and told Mel and Sharon that Holy Name was “a very welcoming community.  I only wish Steven had been here.  He would’ve enjoyed it.”

       

         

     

Katy after Mass

Steven’s illness was at its worst when we docked in Ketchikan; so Mel, Sharon, and I went to church without him.  Then, after Mass, a friendly young woman approached our bench to offer us and Kathy from Idaho a ride back to the docks.

“But we have canes and a walker,” I heard someone say.  No matter.  The SUV hatch popped open, and in they went without our assistance.

Along the way we learned quite a bit about Katy, “sixth-generation Ketchikan,” and her family.  She comes from a long line of educators— her grandfather was school superintendent— and she loves working with special-needs kids in class.  She also teaches ballet after school and has great aspirations still in the works.

Naturally engaging

A lovely experience all the way around on Good Shepherd Sunday, we enjoyed our time at Holy Name Church.  Inclusive and naturally engaging, parishioners built community with ease.  By selflessly accommodating visitors from faraway places, they made us an integral part of their finely woven tapestry within God’s kingdom.  All were welcome.

         

          

          

          

Prayers

Dear God, you appointed your only-begotten Son to be the savior of mankind, and you commanded his name to be Jesus.  I beg that a most ardent love of your divine son imprint that name on my heart; that it always be on my mind and frequently on my lips; and that it be my defense in temptation, my refuge in danger, and my consolation and strength in the hour of my death.  Amen.

Jesus, name full of glory, grace, love and strength!  You are the refuge of those who repent, our banner of warfare in this life, the medicine of souls, the comfort of those who morn, the delight of those who believe, the light of those who preach the true faith, the wages of those who toil, the healing of the sick.  To you our devotion aspires; by you our prayers are received.  We delight in contemplating you.  O name of Jesus, you are the glory of all the saints for eternity.  Amen (St. Bernardine of Sienna).

Quotes

“If you are bound down by sickness, if sorrows weary you, if you are trembling with fear, invoke the name of Jesus” (St Lawrence Justinian).

The sweet name of Jesus produces in us holy thoughts, fills the soul with noble sentiments, strengthens virtue, begets good works, and nourishes pure affection.  All spiritual food leaves the soul dry, if it contain not that penetrating oil, the name Jesus (St. Bernard of Clairvaux).

To holy people the very name of Jesus is a name to feed upon, a name to transport.  His name can raise the dead and transfigure and beautify the living (Blessed John Henry Newman).

August 25, 2019

God loves diversity.  That means God’s glory cannot be glimpsed without appreciating the variety of people, cultures, and creatures populating the universe (Mary M. McGlone, CSJ).

January 3, 2020

Oh, how great is your name, O Lord!  It is the strength of my soul.  When my strength fails and darkness invades my soul, your name is the sun whose rays give lights and also warmth (St. Faustina Kawalska).

Links of interest…  Diocese of Juneau: facebook / The Inside Passage  (monthly paper) / website…  Good Shepherd Sunday: commentaryreflections / significance…  Holy Name Church: about / facebook / locationwebsite…  Ketchikan: about / things to doknow / visit / website…  Molly of Denaliabout / facebookNPR / podcast / premiere / You Tube…  Prayers: devotionGolden ArrowHoly Name Society / litany

WP posts…  Authentic delight…  Mission accomplished…  Verbosity

Authentic delight

Except for the lively conversation with the folks at Alaskan Fudge Co., Juneau failed to impress the day before.  And what if Skagway was more of the same?  Part of me dreaded knowing, but part of me had to find out.

Morning walk

Unlike our first shore excursion the day seemed warmer and more in keeping with my South Texas disposition.  We walked and walked and took lots of photos of a place so reminiscent of the Wild West that Skagway could’ve been a movie set.  The trains, the buildings, the openness.  Was the town even real?  No brick buildings, lots of windows.  How did folks stay warm in frigid temperatures?

Despite my pea brain’s many rhetorical questions, everything was quiet and peaceful compared to Juneau.  Streets were wide with little traffic, and residents carried on as if we visitors (or intruders) were part of the town’s finely woven tapestry.  No fuss, no rush, no sidewalk vendors.  We moved about freely in an alternate reality, oblivious of life back home, proactively engaged in the moment.

Steven’s third eye was busy making memories, so I contained myself on discovering familiarity: “Mexican food.  Fish tacos today.”  I wanted some right then, right there!  And I don’t even eat fish tacos!  Then, too, my whole being knew that tacos were just the tip of the iceberg.  Oh, the fascination!  I longed to learn more!

Soon after, I noticed a living-breathing advertisement in the form of a very pleasant woman wholly absorbed in the book she read outside Skaguay News Depot.  How daring!  How novel!  Is she the owner? I wondered.  How will she lure us into the store?  Scary thought, but so intriguing!  She didn’t even flinch as we passed her by.  She just kept reading.  What audacity!  Her wordless sales approach stunned, amused, and tantalized my curiosity.  We’d definitely stop on our way back!

As Steven made his way down Broadway, I window-shopped, took lots of photos, and continued to be amazed.  When Steven veered right onto a side street, I waited in place halfway down to where he explored the Historic Moore Homestead at the end of Spring.  Taking note of my surroundings— three totem poles; a shop owner chatting with a supplier; a workman restoring the Moore Homestead; small buildings that appeared closed; a couple of older-model vehicles parked nearby; and, except for the occasional pedestrian and/or vehicle on the main road, a satisfying stillness unlike any experienced before— I’d pretty much given up on finding a church to explore.

       

       

       

       

          

       

       

       

     

       

       

Church on Fifth Street

Making our way back on Broadway, I visually scoured every side street we crossed for the semblance of a sacred space.  Then, oh, my, gosh!  I spotted one!

“There’s a church down there!”

“Where?  I don’t see anything,” Steven said.

“It’s there!  About four or five blocks down!  Can we go take a look?  Maybe this one will be open!”

Oh, joy in the morning!  It was!  It was!  And we had a wonderful time looking, imagining Sunday services, partaking of the congregation’s peace and love.

          

          

          

          

     

    

            

       

     

Bookstore on Broadway Street

So, having fulfilled my desire to explore a church, we walked back into town.  And, on reaching the second block, I told Steven about the bookstore; crossed the street; and, soon enough, ventured in.

“You were quite a sight this morning!” I teased the book reader.

“Can you believe it?  I get paid to do what I love!” she chuckled.

Shortly, another woman joined us and, as she asked if we had something in mind, the book reader disappeared into the back room.  I asked about the children’s books in the window display, and she pointed us toward the many showcased brightly in the front right corner of the shop.

“Feel free to browse as long as you like, and let me know if you have any questions.”

We right away selected three books and asked if we could start placing them on the counter until we were ready to pay.

“Where are you from?” she asked.

We introduced ourselves and told Denise about our jaunt to the First Presbyterian Church, adding that we’d found the unexpected: an unlocked entryway!  And, when I told her about the cookbooks we’d seen at church, she enthused that she had copies of the original (1943/1998), in case we were interested.  We weren’t passing on that!  Denise sweetened the deal, too, by giving us bookmarks and offering a free copy of Gold Rush Cemetery if we purchased Garden City of Alaska.  But, of course!

So, our visit to Skaguay News Depot & Books was more than just a place to shop: Our time there was a worthwhile investment in being good neighbors; sharing observations; and learning lots about the church, the town, and Denise’s family roots in Alaska.

“I love this place!” I said before leaving.

“Well, you know what that means, don’t you?  You have to move here now.”

Dangle a carrot, why not?  I was there in a heartbeat!

       

               

Afternoon tour

After lunch, Mel, Sharon, Steven, and I headed out to take the White Pass & Yukon Route scenic journey.  As the train passed through town people waved because, we were told, they always do.  So, up, up, up we went… until we came back down.

         

          

          

          

          

          

          

          

          

          

                 

Authentic delight

Docking in Skagway I prepared for another day of mental warfare with vendors: Go with the flow.  Make the most of the day because we may never pass this way again.  Then— surprise!— an unexpected outcome.

The town was quiet, unimposing, authentic.  Residents went about their business as visitors went about theirs, exactly as one would expect in one’s hometown.  But what really impressed me was the First Presbyterian Church on Fifth and Main Streets.

Who advertises “Doors Are Always Open!” on the stoop’s top step?  Who leaves items for the taking on a little round table with a pretty crocheted tablecloth?

Admiring the printed treasures beside the empty glass jar, Steven and I smiled at each other as momentary disbelief gave way to sheer delight.  These folks trust that others are kindred spirits!  So, taking the invitation to heart, I helped myself to two cookbooks, a baggie with six Centennial Celebration cards and envelopes, and a postcard, after which Steven placed money in the jar.  Simply amazing!

An authentic delight, Skagway captured our imagination, appealing to our insatiable love of learning, nature, adventure, and more.  Can’t wait to go again!

Links of interest…  First Presbyterian Church: about (map) / drawings / facebook / website…  Molly of Denaliabout / facebook / NPR / podcast / premiere / youtube…  Pittsburgh Theological Seminary: Advent & Lent devotionals & archive / publications…  Skaguay News Depot: bookstore / news…  Skagway: about / CVB / facebook / Historic Moore Homestead: mapphotos / Mexican food / newspaper / Travel Alaska / website…  White Pass Railroad excursion & train tour (WPYR)…

WP posts…  Mission accomplished…  Naturally engaging…  Sweet treat…  Verbosity

Mission accomplished

After four days on the road, we boarded the Carnival Legend in Seattle, Washington and set off for an eight-day cruise to Alaska: the greatest adventure of our lifetime.

Juneau

May eighth was cold, dreary, and wet in Juneau.  Steven had been to Alaska before, so he knew what to expect.  I layered my shirts, pulled my hood tightly to frame my face, and wore snug gloves.  Then off we went in search of what fascinates us: churches.

          

         

          

       

          

    

Cathedral of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary

We walked several blocks before we came to the first church, situated on the corner of Gold and Fifth Streets.  Doors were locked, so we admired the grounds.  I couldn’t believe that flowers could grow so beautifully in Alaska!

        

        

          

          

St. Nicholas Orthodox Church

Standing on the corner, I’d spotted the hexagonal, blue-and-white church.  Would it be open?  It wasn’t.  Was I disappointed?  A tad.  But it was Wednesday afternoon, so we explored the precious sacred space and imagined ourselves returning another day.  Then, on walking past, I peeked into the yard for no special reason and giggled.  Right there kissing-close to the fence was a pair of red shoes reminiscent of La Befana: The witch of Christmas and Glinda’s ruby slippers from the The Wizard of Oz.  My imagination conjured all sorts of possibilities!  What a priceless memory!

          

                

       

Mission accomplished

My toes felt like rocks; my hands, icicles.  We’d found the churches and taken the photos, so all I wanted was my reward: a bag of popcorn from down the street.

We took our time entering a couple of shops as we prepared ourselves for the obstacle course ahead and the siren calls from the relentless vendors standing in the doorways— some even on the sidewalks!— ready to lure folks into their shops.

We prevailed and made it to the Alaskan Fudge Co. to chat with the owner and his young helper.  How special to share real conversation, to hear their stories.

I was impressed with their genuineness, their humor, their welcoming spirit, their loyalty to each other, and their eagerness to be of service— traits I would observe among Alaskans in other places, too.  So, the takeaway from our mission accomplished in Juneau became the recurring theme of the greatest adventure of our lifetime.

     

          

      

          

Links of interest…  Alaskan Fudge Co: candies & giftsfacebook / recipe…  Cathedral of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary: about / facebook / website…  Diocese of Juneau: facebook / The Inside Passage (monthly paper) / website…  Juneau: about / things to do / travel…  La Befana: The witch of Christmas (more)…  Molly of Denaliabout / facebook / NPR / podcast / premiere / youtube…  St. Nicholas Orthodox Church: aboutfacebook / website…  Wizard of Oz (ruby slippers & more)…

WP posts…  Authentic delight…  Naturally engaging…  Verbosity

Pilgrim’s journey

Not quite five years ago I fell in love with the stations of the cross during our eight-day silent retreat.  But they took on new meaning a year and a half later when I discovered the connection between mom’s decades-old prayer and the fourth station of the cross: when Mary, rightly concerned, looks for Jesus and finds him, sadly, on the way to Calvary.

“Hortelanito, por Dios, dime la pura verdad: si Jesús de Nazaret por aquí lo has visto pasar” (Mendoza, 1939).  Have you seen Jesus pass this way?

Pilgrim’s journey

All of us are travelers, pilgrims on the march to our promised land.  We journey each day one stage nearer to our true home, the place our heavenly Father has reserved for us.

Sometimes our route may be rocky and torturous.  We often grow tired and weary from the obstacles we encounter.  We all have some experience of the truth of the poet’s words: “Now and then there’s a toll gate where you buy your way with tears.”  Even Christ, our lord, admits to us that “you indeed have sorrow now.”

Yet there is no other way to God.  As scripture notes, “How narrow the way and how straight the gate that leads to everlasting life.”  Christ, our leader, trod the same painful path he asks us to follow.  His way of the cross is also our way of salvation; so he now accompanies us on our way of the cross.

We will find our own journey easier when we daily imitate Christ and walk with him along the road to unending life.  As we apply Christ’s example and his merits to our personal situation, we will be strengthened to follow him through pain to glory.

When we think and pray even one station each day, Christ himself will help us perform our daily tasks and lend us his support (Franciscan Mission Associates, B-13R, pp. 2-3; edited).

St. Anselm’s prayer

O Lord, my God, teach my heart this day where and how to see you, where and how to find you.  You have made me and remade me; you have bestowed on me all the good things I possess and, still, I do not know you.  I have not yet done that for which I was made.  Teach me to seek you, for I cannot seek you unless you teach me or find you unless you show yourself to me.  Let me seek you in my desire; let me desire you in my seeking.  Let me find you by loving you; let me love you when I find you.  Amen.

1: Jesus is condemned.

We adore you, O Christ, and we praise you
because, by your holy cross, you have redeemed the world.

                

           

Lord Jesus, may we deliver ourselves up with patience and love
to the many little deaths that fidelity in your service may require of us.

2: Jesus takes his cross.

We adore you, O Christ, and we praise you
because, by your holy cross, you have redeemed the world.

           

           

Strengthen us, Lord Jesus, to carry our cross
with faith and trust and without complaining of its weight.

3: Jesus falls the first time.

We adore you, O Christ, and we praise you
because, by your holy cross, you have redeemed the world.

           

           

Be with us always, Lord Jesus.
Despite the weakness of the flesh may we never waver in our loyalty to you.

4: Jesus meets his mother.

We adore you, O Christ, and we praise you.
because, by your holy cross, you have redeemed the world.

           

           

Lord Jesus, may your mother and ours remain always
a sure hope and comfort for us, your pilgrim people.

5: Simon helps Jesus carry the cross.

We adore you, O Christ, and we praise you
because, by your holy cross, you have redeemed the world.

           

           

May we be generous, Lord Christ, in coming to the aid
of our fellow pilgrims during our earthly journey.

6: Veronica wipes the face of Jesus.

We adore you, O Christ, and we praise you
because, by your holy cross, you have redeemed the world.

           

           

Dear Lord, may we never turn a cold shoulder but always
a smiling face to those who look to us for comfort.

7: Jesus falls the second time.

We adore you, O Christ, and we praise you
because, by your holy cross, you have redeemed the world.

           

           

Gird us with new strength, dear Christ, for the steep climb
and the hard stretches along the road to our glorious resurrection.

8: Jesus speaks to the women.

We adore you, O Christ, and we praise you
because, by your holy cross, you have redeemed the world.

           

           

Lord Jesus, may the assurance that our Father in heaven will someday
wipe our tears away sustain us in the dark and painful hours of life.

9: Jesus falls the third time.

We adore you, O Christ, and we praise you
because, by your holy cross, you have redeemed the world.

           

           

Help us, dear Lord, to pick ourselves up each time we fall.  Conscious of our weakness, may we stretch a helping hand to all who share our human frailty.

10: Jesus is stripped of his clothes.

We adore you, O Christ, and we praise you
because, by your holy cross, you have redeemed the world.

           

           

Dear Jesus, stripped of your garments in the passion
bless all our efforts at purification and renewal.

11: Jesus is nailed to the cross.

We adore you, O Christ, and we praise you
because, by your holy cross, you have redeemed the world.

           

           

We give you thanks and praise, dear Savior, for submitting willingly
to suffering and death for our sake.  We bless your precious cross
by which the joy and salvation came into the world.

12: Jesus dies on the cross.

We adore you, O Christ, and we praise you
because, by your holy cross, you have redeemed the world.

           

           

We are yours, blessed Savior, whether we live or die.
In baptism we have agreed to be yours in time and eternity.
May we be made dead to sin and alive to God with you.

13: Jesus is taken down from the cross.

We adore you, O Christ, and we praise you
because, by your holy cross, you have redeemed the world.

           

           

Lord Jesus, you are the resurrection and the life.
May we stand before the world as your witnesses, vivid signs of the living God.

14: Jesus is laid in the tomb.

We adore you, O Christ, and we praise you
because, by your holy cross, you have redeemed the world.

           

           

Lord Jesus, may we always continue in the strength which comes
from our hope in your mercy, goodness, and love for us.

Concluding prayer

You, O God, overcame death through your only-begotten Son who opened for us the gates of life eternal.  Help us, then, to carry out in our lives the desires you inspire in us.  This we ask through the risen Christ, our lord, who now lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, God for all the ages.  Amen.

Contact information

Stations prayers are from Your Way of the Cross (B-8/15), received from Franciscan Mission Associates, P.O. Box 598, Mt. Vernon, NY 10551-0598.

                 

Pictured stations are from sacred spaces in Texas: St. Jude Chapel (Dallas), Our Lady Star of the Sea (Port Isabel), St. Albert the Great (Round Rock), Our Lady of Sorrows (McAllen), Sacred Heart (Cotulla), and St. Benedict’s (San Benito), respectively.

Resources

Creative Communications for the Parish has lots of devotional materials for all ages. What I most appreciate are their booklets for Advent and Lent, like the two below.

             

March 28, 2019

“True reverence for the Lord’s passion means fixing the eyes of our heart on Jesus crucified and recognizing in him our own humanity” (Pope St. Leo the Great).

March 29, 2019

“We need no wings to go in search of him, but have only to look upon him present within us” (St. Teresa of Avila).

March 31, 2019

Something in you dies when you bear the unbearable.  And it is only in that dark night of the soul that you are prepared to see as God sees and to love as God loves (Ram Dass).

April 1, 2019

It is a lesson we all need— to let alone the things that do not concern us.  He has other ways for others to follow him; all do not go by the same path.  It is for each of us to learn the path by which he requires us to follow him, and to follow him in that path (St. Katharine Drexel).

April 14, 2019

This is what Jesus is exposing and defeating on the cross.  He did not come to change God’s mind about us.  It did not need changing.  Jesus came to change our minds about God— and about ourselves— and about where goodness and evil really lie (Richard Rohr, OFM).

April 20, 2019

Holy Saturday…  The sky holds tight her purple shroud, / Broken by the tips of blackened trees / Which stand in silent mourning. / All creation’s quaking, grieving are now a jealous sentinel, / Guarding the gates of morning / Listening / To the eternal Word which has been spoken, / Watching / For Adam’s bond to be forever broken, / All of time bows a prayerful head / To await its Maker’s rising from the dead. /  And I, / Too often fraught with unbelief, / Now unite my cry to that of the good thief. /  Bending low beneath the standard of the King, / I whisper to the darkness, / “I believe” (Sisters of Carmel, 2019).

Jesus & Mary by Jennie Price (2018)

Links of interest…  Be a pilgrim…  Communications for the Parish…  Fifteen ways Jesus Christ suffered in love…  Franciscan Mission Associates…  Majesty of Christ crucified…  Prayer before a crucifix…  Ram Dass: Dying before you die / horrible beauty of suffering…  Relics from the crucifixion…  Roaring lion, mourning dove, word of God…  Signs & symbols…  Stations: about /  devotion / fish eaters / for families (more) / for kids (coloring pages) / how to do / Jesuitsmaking them worthwhile / on your block / origin / prayers / printables / puppet show / scriptural / significance /  uncomfortable truthway of the cross…  Ten lessons from the agony in the garden…  Via Crucis at the Colosseum with Pope Francis…  Videos: street stations for commuters & bikers….  Way of the cross (preview)…  What it means to worship a man crucified as a criminal & Jesus saw from the cross…  Why pray the stations of the cross…  the Word among us

WP posts…  Capuchin church stations…  Christ’s passion…  For all time…  Full circle…  God’s lovely gifts…  Growing pains…  Lady of sorrows…  Lenten meditations…  Lenten reflections…  Lenten resources…  Lingering memory…  Our Lady star…  Prayerful ways…  Quiet prayer time…  Repeated prayers…  Sioux chapel stations…  Sorrowful redemption…  St. Benedict’s…  St. Jude chapel…  Three visits…  Undeniable familiarity…  Unexpected detours…  Welcoming spirit

Remembrances

Since our monthly Saturday meeting in McAllen was rescheduled, attending four o’clock Mass at Our Lady of Sorrows was out of the question.  We needed another plan, so we opted for church closer to home.

For two days I vacillated between St. Benedict’s in San Benito and Our Lady Star of the Sea in Port Isabel.  Both are very special to us, very welcoming.  But I finally gave in to the gentle though insistent nudge from the voice within.

St. Benedict’s

Walking to our usual spot— fourth pew on the left— we quickly noticed a rather large frame topped with a floppy black bow with a large wreath beside it next to the ambo.

“Someone died,” I whispered to Steven.  “Is it a priest or a deacon?”

Once seated, I leaned forward and quietly asked the woman in the third pew who the man was.

“Fr. Nacho, our former priest, died March fifteenth,” the woman replied.  “He was with us sixteen years.  And then Fr. Tinajero took his place.”

I thanked the woman, sat back on the pew, and told Steven he’d been correct.

Remembrances

We’d been to St. Benedict’s two or three times when Fr. Nacho had celebrated Mass in Fr. Tinajero’s absence, so we’d delighted in his fatherly love: anecdotal homilies oozing with gentle wisdom, self-deprecating humor, and genuine engagement.  He loved his sheep, and they responded accordingly.  What a gift to witness their interactions.

Fr. Nacho had a positive outlook on life.  When he spoke about his mortality and his physical limitations, we chuckled.  Many even laughed out loud.  He was undaunted, down-to-earth funny, and gratefully aware that God was in charge.

Naturally, we were saddened to learn of his passing.  But, mostly, we were glad to have known him, even if just for a little while, so we could remember him with his flock.

       

     

       

       

           

Prayers

Daily prayer for the dead…  Immortal God. holy lord, father and protector of all you have created, we raise our hearts to you today for those who have passed out of this mortal life.

For all the faithful who have died we pray but, in particular, for those dear to us: parents, relatives, friends.  Nor do we forget all who did good to us while on earth and who helped us by their prayers, sacrifice, and example.  We pray also for any who may have done us harm and who stand in special need of your forgiveness.

May the merits and prayers of our virgin mother, Mary, and those of all your angels and saints speak for us and assist them now.  This we ask in Christ’s name.  Amen.

For the faithful departed…  Give them eternal rest, O Lord, and let them share your glory.

God, our creator and redeemer, by your power Christ conquered death and returned to you in glory.  May all your people who have gone before us in faith share his victory and enjoy the vision of your glory forever where Christ lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, forever and ever.  Amen.

You are, O God, the creator and savior of all the faithful.  Forgive your servants all their sins and, by our loving prayers, grant them the pardon they always hoped for.  You live and reign forever in union with the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

For a priest…  God of mercy, we who receive the sacraments of salvation pray for [name], your servant and priest.  You made him a minister of your mysteries on earth.  May he rejoice in the full knowledge of your truth in heaven.  We ask this through Christ, our lord.  Amen.

Quotes

Happy are those who die in the Lord.  Happy indeed the Spirit says; now they can rest forever from their work (Revelations 14:13).

In meadows of green grass he lets me lie.  To the waters of repose he leader me: There he revives my soul (Psalm 23:2).

“What eye has not seen and ear has not heard, what has not entered the human heart [is] what God has prepared for those who love him” (1 Corinthians 2:9).

Contact information

Prayers and quotes are from Let Us Pray for Our Faithful Departed (B-11/12) and Twelve Days of Prayer for Your Faithful Departed (B-16/07) from Franciscan Mission Associates, P.O. Box 598, Mount Vernon, NY 10551-0598.

                

April 5, 2019

Death— whether one of many deaths to the false self or our final physical dying— is simply returning to our spacious ground of being, to our foundation in love.  Life doesn’t truly end; it simply changes form and continues evolving into ever new shapes and beauty (Richard Rohr, OFM).

Eternal rest grant unto him, O Lord, and let perpetual light shine upon him.
May Fr. Nacho rest in peace.

Links of interest…  Benedictine benedictions…  Church in San Benito, TX: facebookMass times (more) / website…  Commending the soul to God…  Immeasurable charity of praying for the dead…  Liberating power of the St. Benedict medal (spiritual weapons)…  Making the case for fraternal correction…  Prayers: book /  death & dying / for holy soulsthe deceased – those in purgatory – when one fears death / meditations / more…  Praying the stations of the cross while mourning a loved one’s death…  St. Benedict: medal (braceletjubilee – more – seven things to know) / memorial / prayers: litany – novena – prayers (more)…  Turn mourning into joy

WP posts…  Call of service…  Lady of sorrows…  Lingering memory…  Mourning joy…  Our Lady’s snow…  Pilgrim’s journey…  Prayerful messages…  St. Benedict’s

Sweet treat

January 22, 2019, Steven and I joined the Texas Tropical Trail (TTT) group in Alice, TX for its 158th monthly partner event.  And what a time we had!

Everything— from the morning’s assortment of colorful doughnuts, coffee, and juice at the Chamber of Commerce to the tour of the historic courthouse to lunch at the country club to the four afternoon presentations— kept us clamoring for “more, please.”

The last speaker, Betty Ash, a retired teacher, captivated us beyond imagining.  Her early Jim Wells County history was a firsthand experience: exciting, hilarious, and memorable.  But her Native American stories— a glimpse of South Texas history that’s rarely discussed— had us wholly engrossed.  My hand hurt from trying to jot down every precious morsel.

Two-thirty came around, but we just weren’t ready to go!  So, Nancy Deviney, TTT executive director who plans surprises in advance, eased our reluctance by reminding us of “the optional tour for those of you who are interested.”

Sweet treat

Better than the bonus plan, the unexpected giveaway turned out to be quite a piloncito: the sweet treat that mom’s grandmother would gift to each of her country-store customers (and children) as both a token of appreciation and an incentive to return.

Because we’d visited the First Presbyterian Church in Corpus Christi in January and Pastor Chip Blackshear had told us about the beautiful stained-glass window that had been moved to the church in Alice, Kathy Wemer of the Nueces County Historical Commission had arranged for our group to view the window.  So, eighteen of us rushed to visit with Pastor Kris Bair at the First Presbyterian Church on North Adams Street.

What a pristine sacred space!  Regardless of where one sits or stands, the stained-glass window is the focal point behind the altar: a delectable ethereal delight.

        

           

                    

                       

       

       

       

               

               

Prayers from the Pittsburgh Theological Seminary

Abba, Father, thank you for granting me unlimited opportunities to present my needs to you.  Help me to be content in receiving whatever paths and provisions you offer.  May my frail and feeble faith keep me open to trust that you know the way I must go and be all-sufficient as I continue my journey through life.  Through Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.

Dear heavenly Father, may we practice a posture of readiness in our waiting for the time when you will again break into our current reality.  As our brother Teilhard de Chardin reminds us to do, help us, “above all, [to] trust in the slow work of God,” a long time though it may take.

Dear Lord, please forgive me when I forget that you are God and the owner of my heart, the caregiver of my life and the teacher of my soul.  I confess that the world is convincing in its teaching that the acquisition of material things can bring happiness and that being right and being in power are more important than following you.  Forgive me when I choose to judge others because of their politics, their education, the color of their skin, or the amount of money they have in their pockets.  The love of power, fame, and material wealth can twist my Christian intentions from selflessness to selfishness, from welcoming to wall-building, and from caring to critical.  I repent from my lack of faithfulness and ask that you light the way of love for me to follow so that I might be guided by the truth and the life found within the way of Jesus Christ in whose name I pray.  Amen.

Father, we come to you through your son and our lord, Jesus, and by the power of the Spirit with thanksgiving.  Continue to intervene in our lives in miraculous ways so that we may proclaim your miracles to those near and far from you.  Help us to not be gripped with fear, but instead give us the courage to be your spokespersons.  May you be glorified in all we say and do.  Amen.

God of hope and joy, the day draws near when the glory of your Son will brighten the night of the waiting world.  Let no sorrow hinder the joy of those who seek him.  Let no sin obscure the vision of wisdom by those who find him.  We pray through Jesus Christ our Lord (Book of Common Worship, Daily Prayer, p. 104, WJK).

Gracious, loving, and all-powerful God, quiet our hearts, increase our faith, and help us always to look to you, the one and only God, who is able to do exceedingly and abundantly beyond anything we might imagine and think.  Although the world seems out of control, teach us to wait on you, our hope, and to trust you with every aspect of our individual and corporate lives.  For you are our rock, our salvation, and our refuge.  Amen.

Heavenly Father, my God, and King!  I come before you in awe of your greatness.  I pray that in those times of frustration that I will be gracious, merciful, slow to anger, and abounding in steadfast love as you are so often with us, your children.  I thank you, Lord, for upholding me when I am falling and raising me up when I am bowed down.  I thank you and praise you for filling all my desires, hearing my cry, and saving me!  Amen.

Holy and most faithful God, we thank you for your grace and for the gift of your Son, Jesus.  Help us turn away from the worldly life of sin and turn instead to Christ Jesus so that your Spirit may dwell in us to give us life and peace.  Thank you that, in Christ, we do not stand condemned.  Thank you for your love and forgiveness which restore us to righteousness.  In Jesus’s name we pray.  Amen.

Lord, we are yours and you are ours.  Help us to sing a new song.  Let us worship you with the entirety of our bodies, thus bearing witness to the Incarnated One.  We pray in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Lord, you are our rock.  You are our foundation in times of darkness, and we know we can trust in you.  Yet sometimes we cannot feel your presence.  Give us strength to praise you and hope in you when we do not have the strength on our own.  Meet us in our despair, gracious God, and hear us when we cry out.  You are the one our souls long for.  We praise and pray to you now in your Holy name.  Amen.

Loving Father, we live in a world with many defined boundaries.  We view people on opposite sides of those boundaries as our enemies, our oppressors.  Purge our feelings of hate, enmity, and bitterness, and replace them with humility, patience, understanding, strength, and courage.  In our difficult work, help us to live with your eyes and your heart in the sure knowledge of our future hope in Jesus Christ, our Lord and Savior.  Amen.

Merciful God, I am grateful that your love surpasses all knowledge and understanding.  It is impossible to grasp how wide and long and high and deep is the love you have for me.  May you speak to me in my heart to influence, direct, and guide my every step so your purpose for me will be fulfilled to the fullest.  In the name of the Father, and the Son, and the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

You strengthen us and bless us, O Lord, because of your endless love for us.  This love is too great for us to comprehend, but we thank you for it and for the grace you shower upon us.  How wonderful you are.  You care for us.  You grant us your peace.  When we falter, Lord, you pick us up.  When we stray, you lead us home.  We long to be in your presence and ask for your blessings of strength and comfort that we may shine your light into the world.  We love you, Lord, and praise your name.  Amen.

March 30, 2019

Working on the thank-you card that I’d promised to send Pastor Kris, I googled the address of the church and was stunned to learn that the First Presbyterian Church will close by December 31, 2019.  This is very sad for the church community, but what will become of the beautiful stained-glass windows?  Both a final worship service and a celebration of the life of the church are planned (Meghan Donald; Alice Echo, 2019).

April 5, 2019

The church is not that building.  The church is the people.  The building is the sanctuary where we meet so, if we stay together as a congregation, the church is alive and well.  We can rebuild the building as long as we stay together (Rev. Gerald Toussaint).

November 24, 2019

Steven and I were unable to attend the final worship service, but we did create a card as a loving tribute to be gifted to everyone at the celebration.

     

Links of interest…  First Presbyterian Church of Alice to close by the end of the year…  History of the stained-glass window originally at the First Presbyterian Church in Corpus Christi…  Pittsburgh Theological Seminary: Advent & Lent devotionals & archive / publications…  Texas Historic Sites atlas…  Texas Tropical Trail

WP posts…  Authentic delight…  Dunes chapel…  Prayerful messages…  Third charm

Niño de Cebú

What a glorious evening in honor of the Santo Niño de Cebú!  Mass at seven was concelebrated by Bishop Mulvey, Fr. Paul, and Fr. Kisito at St. Pius X in Corpus Christi.

          

Bishop’s homily

It’s good to be with you again this year.  I can’t believe another year has gone by.  Seems like only yesterday— or at least a few weeks ago— that we were here for this beautiful celebration of Santo Niño.  So I’m very happy to be here with you again this evening.

Three epiphanies

You may have noticed in the feast of Epiphany which was two weeks ago that there we spoke of three epiphanies.

The Church has proclaimed that Jesus is made known, revealed in three ways.  So, the first is the Magi that come from afar, meaning that people from everywhere are called to come and adore Christ.  And there they saw the newborn son, the word God come in the flesh.  Last week we celebrated the baptism of the Lord where Jesus reveals— the Holy Spirit reveals— the relationship with God the Father and his son when it is heard, “This is my beloved son.  Listen to him.”  An epiphany.  And, today, as we read the gospel of St. John with Jesus at the wedding feast of Cana, again his glory is shown in his first miracle.  Another epiphany.

And so these three epiphanies surround this time of the year as we celebrate the birth of the son of God, his gift to us.

Wedding at Cana

In that wedding feast of Cana, if I were to ask you or you were to ask each other what that feast was about, you could probably recount some of the details of the jars that were there— that were empty, that were filled with water, that Jesus changed them into wine, that Mary asked him to do it— those kinds of things of details.

St. John’s account

Many stories, of course, in forms of jokes, unfortunately, use this particular scene of Jesus’s life for humor.  Yet St. John not only recounts the details, but the beauty of the gospel.  You know, we have Matthew, Mark, and Luke, the synoptics.  They kind of line up with each other, but St. John takes it to another level.  His is the contemplative gospel that recounts events that have happened, but he goes much deeper into the symbolism of what was happening.

From the Jewish culture of which he was a part, he can also see the similarities that Jesus brings by the newness that Jesus adds to it.  So what do we find for our edification tonight at this particular scene of the wedding feast of Cana?

Six, not seven

Number six is one of the significant symbolisms, which you probably have heard if you’ve studied any kind of a Bible course or you’ve attended a class or maybe you’ve heard it in a homily.  But the number seven is the perfect number.  God rested on the seventh day.  So many other increments of seven— forty-nine et cetera— speak of the perfection of God’s work.  And so it’s interesting for St. John that there were six jars, not seven.

Being that there was an insufficiency there, that in this particular wedding feast which, for the Jewish people a wedding feast in a small town or any town was a monumental moment that went all week long, the bride and the groom had to remain dressed in their wedding garments all week.  The doors were open.  People came in and out to visit them and to greet them all week long.  So the wedding feast was extremely important to society, just as for us tonight Santo Niño is a part of the culture of the Philippines, is part of your culture.  And so, when St. John points out that there were only six jars, he’s saying that what is about to happen is the completion of what is insufficient, that Jesus brings something new.

Filling the jars

The stewards were asked to fill those jars with water.  Again, absurd for the wedding feast because, of course, wine was to be there and, as St. John reports, the best wine was to be served first.  And so, to use water meant that something was lacking.

Not knowing what was to happen the stewards, probably with huge questions in their minds, filled the jars with water.  They were instructed by the Blessed Mother— by Mary— to fill them with water.

Today in our sufficiency we would, say, go out to— I won’t name any of the stores around here.  I don’t want to offend anybody.  If you were to go to another one, then I would know.  But we’d just go down the street.  Get some more.  But water?  Water?

The greatest gift

When they did so, Jesus at that moment then changed it not into just regular wine, but to the best of wine which, again, is saying he’s there at that feast, at that important moment.

Some say the bridegroom was a relative of Mary’s somewhere in her family tree, so they were well known there.  But he brings in the best.  And St. John can easily see that it refers to himself and his own ministry that, when Jesus comes to us— when he has come to us— he comes as God’s greatest gift: the best, not just the ordinary, but the very best.

Relationship

We see that, in the book of the prophet Isaiah tonight, when the prophecy of Isaiah speaks of God marrying his people, coming into relationship with his people, which means us, these symbolisms, these realities of marriage, covenant, of wine that we celebrate now in the sacrament here at the altar— all of these are mediums by which God is among us.

Jesus wants to announce in this epiphany at the wedding feast of Cana that, in his person, God is now here with you.  The number six is no longer imperfect.  The water is no longer water, but wine.  And, he is there in their midst, to bring joy to their hearts.  This is the message for you and me tonight.

We can ask in our own lives, have we invited Jesus into our homes?  Do we invite Jesus into our families?  Do we invite Jesus into our difficulties?  Or do we just sit and complain and complain and write letter after letter of anger et cetera?

Inviting Jesus into our lives is what brings something new to any situation or to any relationship.  Without Jesus in our relationship, there is no peace.  And our relationships remain mundane.  We use them, but Jesus wants to be part of our life.  And what is the relationship that Jesus brings?

Love and sacrifice

As we continue on in the gospel of St. John, or if we continue looking there, what is that wine that Jesus brought us?  What is that newness that Jesus brought to the wedding feast where friends were gathered?

It is the wine of the new commandment.  I give you a new commandment: Love one another.

Even if the wedding feast in Jesus takes just human love— just human relationships, a human marriage— and changes it into something new, into something that is vital, something that is life-giving, that couple hopefully one day recalled or heard the words of Jesus.

Love one another.  Sacrifice your life for one another.  That’s what brings joy and peace to people’s lives, not taking away from one another, not extracting life out of others, not commanding others but being there in true harmony as God is harmony himself.  That’s the newness that St. John understands, that Jesus brought to that wedding feast: to be introduced into that couple’s life as he was about to, in the next years, sacrifice for you and for me.

Jesus was meaning to say, then, “Sacrifice your life for one another.”

Sacrifice your life for the good of your brothers and sisters.  Don’t keep Jesus out of your life.  Don’t keep his commandment to love as some abstract suggestion.  It’s at the heart of our lives to love one another as God has loved us in Jesus Christ.

At the end of the gospel reading of the wedding feast at Cana, St. John tells us that Jesus did this as the beginning of his signs at Cana in Galilee.  And so he revealed his glory.  He revealed that something new is here.

So, you want to go along with the crowd?  That’s fine.  But you’ll find nothing new.  Jesus is what’s new even today.  And, St. John says, “His disciples began to believe in him” (John 2:11).

Welcoming heart

The question for us tonight is: Do we believe in him?  Do we believe that he is what’s new?  Do we believe that in our broken Church, our broken world, we need him at our wedding feast?  Do we need him in our lives?  The disciples obviously thought so.  They believed in him.

What does it take to believe, sisters and brothers?  It’s not believing just a bunch of rules and morals and doctrines.  It means believing in the person of Jesus Christ.  And what do we need to do that?  Jesus told us.  “You will not enter the kingdom of God unless you become like a little child.”  There we have the meaning of this night.  Many would say to you probably, “Well, Jesus is not a baby anymore.  He’s a grown up.”  That’s true.  But Santo Niño reminds us that he wants us to have the same humility, the same dependence in our life as a child— as a child.

The role of a child in our Christian faith is not insignificant.  It is extremely important.  So, as we celebrate tonight, as we pray for those who are in harm’s way, perhaps in any way, in the Philippines and beyond, let us remember that it’s being children that we can be open to the newness of God in our life.  It’s a child that throws open the door to friends when they come to the door.  It’s a child who wants to serve.  Let’s have that childlike— not childish, but childlike— heart in our lives that we can welcome the new things that God wants to bring into our lives every day when we say, “Welcome to our feast.  Welcome to my house” (Bishop Michael Mulvey; January 19, 2019; transcribed audio recording, edited).

         

          

                

        

                  

Prayer

Santo Niño, holy child Jesus, we adore you, we hope in you, we love you.  Have mercy on us.  Listen to our prayers, especially to those who are suffering, dying, and grieving.  Help us imitate your humility, simplicity, compassion, total self-giving, and love.  Illumine our minds, purify our hearts, and cleanse our souls, for we wish to glorify you in all that we do so that at the end of our life, we may see you face to face with God the Father and God the Holy Spirit.

Mother Mary and St. Joseph, through your intercession, may we grow in our love for Our Lord, Jesus Christ.  Amen.

January 20, 2019

“It is our humble conviction that the divine and the human meet in the slightest detail in the seamless garment of God’s creation, in the last speck of dust of our planet” (Pope Francis in Laudato Si).

Our Lady of Sorrows – McAllen, TX

Links of interest…  Child Jesus: coloring pages (more) / devotion / infancy & childhood / just who wasmeditations / miracles (books) / photos / questions & answers / reverence / solemnity / St. Anthonyvisions…  Divine Child: devotion / prayersanctuary…  Holy Infant of Prague: about / brief history / chaplet / feast / history / league / novena / of good health (more) / petitions / prayers in Spanish…  Santo Niño de Atocha: about (more) / chapel / history / miracles (more) / origin / prayers / story…  Santo Niño de Cebú: basilica / devotionfeast (more) / history / homily / novena / origin (more) / perpetual novena / song (YouTube)…  St. John the Baptist Church: facebook / website…  St. Pius X: facebook / Santo Niño devotionwebsite

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