Pilgrim’s journey

Not quite five years ago I fell in love with the stations of the cross during our eight-day silent retreat.  But they took on new meaning a year and a half later when I discovered the connection between mom’s decades-old prayer and the fourth station of the cross: when Mary, concerned, looks for Jesus and finds him, sadly, on the way to Calvary.

“Hortelanito, por Dios, dime la pura verdad: si Jesús de Nazaret por aquí lo has visto pasar” (Mendoza, 1939).  Have you seen Jesus pass this way?

Pilgrim’s journey

All of us are travelers, pilgrims on the march to our promised land.  We journey each day one stage nearer to our true home, the place our heavenly Father has reserved for us.

Sometimes our route may be rocky and torturous.  We often grow tired and weary from the obstacles we encounter.  We all have some experience of the truth of the poet’s words: “Now and then there’s a toll gate where you buy your way with tears.”  Even Christ, our lord, admits to us that “you indeed have sorrow now.”

Yet there is no other way to God.  As scripture notes, “How narrow the way and how straight the gate that leads to everlasting life.”  Christ, our leader, trod the same painful path he asks us to follow.  His way of the cross is also our way of salvation; so he now accompanies us on our way of the cross.

We will find our own journey easier when we daily imitate Christ and walk with him along the road to unending life.  As we apply Christ’s example and his merits to our personal situation, we will be strengthened to follow him through pain to glory.

When we think and pray even one station each day, Christ himself will help us perform our daily tasks and lend us his support (Franciscan Mission Associates, B-13R, pp. 2-3; edited).

St. Anselm’s prayer

O Lord, my God, teach my heart this day where and how to see you, where and how to find you.  You have made me and remade me; you have bestowed on me all the good things I possess and, still, I do not know you.  I have not yet done that for which I was made.  Teach me to seek you, for I cannot seek you unless you teach me or find you unless you show yourself to me.  Let me seek you in my desire; let me desire you in my seeking.  Let me find you by loving you; let me love you when I find you.  Amen.

1: Jesus is condemned.

We adore you, O Christ, and we praise you
because, by your holy cross, you have redeemed the world.

                

           

Lord Jesus, may we deliver ourselves up with patience and love
to the many little deaths that fidelity in your service may require of us.

2: Jesus takes his cross.

We adore you, O Christ, and we praise you
because, by your holy cross, you have redeemed the world.

           

           

Strengthen us, Lord Jesus, to carry our cross
with faith and trust and without complaining of its weight.

3: Jesus falls the first time.

We adore you, O Christ, and we praise you
because, by your holy cross, you have redeemed the world.

           

           

Be with us always, Lord Jesus.
Despite the weakness of the flesh may we never waver in our loyalty to you.

4: Jesus meets his mother.

We adore you, O Christ, and we praise you.
because, by your holy cross, you have redeemed the world.

           

           

Lord Jesus, may your mother and ours remain always
a sure hope and comfort for us, your pilgrim people.

5: Simon helps Jesus carry the cross.

We adore you, O Christ, and we praise you
because, by your holy cross, you have redeemed the world.

           

           

May we be generous, Lord Christ, in coming to the aid
of our fellow pilgrims during our earthly journey.

6: Veronica wipes the face of Jesus.

We adore you, O Christ, and we praise you
because, by your holy cross, you have redeemed the world.

           

           

Dear Lord, may we never turn a cold shoulder but always
a smiling face to those who look to us for comfort.

7: Jesus falls the second time.

We adore you, O Christ, and we praise you
because, by your holy cross, you have redeemed the world.

           

           

Gird us with new strength, dear Christ, for the steep climb
and the hard stretches along the road to our glorious resurrection.

8: Jesus speaks to the women.

We adore you, O Christ, and we praise you
because, by your holy cross, you have redeemed the world.

           

           

Lord Jesus, may the assurance that our Father in heaven will someday
wipe our tears away sustain us in the dark and painful hours of life.

9: Jesus falls the third time.

We adore you, O Christ, and we praise you
because, by your holy cross, you have redeemed the world.

           

           

Help us, dear Lord, to pick ourselves up each time we fall.  Conscious of our weakness, may we stretch a helping hand to all who share our human frailty.

10: Jesus is stripped of his clothes.

We adore you, O Christ, and we praise you
because, by your holy cross, you have redeemed the world.

           

           

Dear Jesus, stripped of your garments in the passion
bless all our efforts at purification and renewal.

11: Jesus is nailed to the cross.

We adore you, O Christ, and we praise you
because, by your holy cross, you have redeemed the world.

           

           

We give you thanks and praise, dear Savior, for submitting willingly
to suffering and death for our sake.  We bless your precious cross
by which the joy and salvation came into the world.

12: Jesus dies on the cross.

We adore you, O Christ, and we praise you
because, by your holy cross, you have redeemed the world.

           

           

We are yours, blessed Savior, whether we live or die.
In baptism we have agreed to be yours in time and eternity.
May we be made dead to sin and alive to God with you.

13: Jesus is taken down from the cross.

We adore you, O Christ, and we praise you
because, by your holy cross, you have redeemed the world.

           

           

Lord Jesus, you are the resurrection and the life.
May we stand before the world as your witnesses, vivid signs of the living God.

14: Jesus is laid in the tomb.

We adore you, O Christ, and we praise you
because, by your holy cross, you have redeemed the world.

           

           

Lord Jesus, may we always continue in the strength which comes
from our hope in your mercy, goodness, and love for us.

Concluding prayer

You, O God, overcame death through your only-begotten Son who opened for us the gates of life eternal.  Help us, then, to carry out in our lives the desires you inspire in us.  This we ask through the risen Christ, our lord, who now lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, God for all the ages.  Amen.

Contact information

Stations prayers are from Your Way of the Cross (B-8/15), received from Franciscan Mission Associates, P.O. Box 598, Mt. Vernon, NY 10551-0598.

                 

Resources

Creative Communications for the Parish has lots of devotional materials for all ages.  And what I most appreciate are the booklets for Advent and Lent, like the two below.

             

Pictured stations are from sacred spaces in Texas: St. Jude Chapel (Dallas), Our Lady Star of the Sea (Port Isabel), St. Albert the Great (Round Rock), Our Lady of Sorrows (McAllen), Sacred Heart (Cotulla), and St. Benedict’s (San Benito), respectively.

March 28, 2019

“True reverence for the Lord’s passion means fixing the eyes of our heart on Jesus crucified and recognizing in him our own humanity” (Pope St. Leo the Great).

March 29, 2019

“We need no wings to go in search of him, but have only to look upon him present within us” (St. Teresa of Avila).

March 31, 2019

Something in you dies when you bear the unbearable.  And it is only in that dark night of the soul that you are prepared to see as God sees and to love as God loves (Ram Dass).

April 1, 2019

It is a lesson we all need— to let alone the things that do not concern us.  He has other ways for others to follow him; all do not go by the same path.  It is for each of us to learn the path by which he requires us to follow him, and to follow him in that path (St. Katharine Drexel).

April 14, 2019

This is what Jesus is exposing and defeating on the cross.  He did not come to change God’s mind about us.  It did not need changing.  Jesus came to change our minds about God— and about ourselves— and about where goodness and evil really lie (Richard Rohr, OFM).

April 20, 2019

Holy Saturday…  The sky holds tight her purple shroud, / Broken by the tips of blackened trees / Which stand in silent mourning. / All creation’s quaking, grieving are now a jealous sentinel, Guarding the gates of morning / Listening / To the eternal Word which has been spoken, Watching / For Adam’s bond to be forever broken, / All of time bows a prayerful head
To await its Maker’s rising from the dead. /  And I, / Too often fraught with unbelief, / Now unite my cry to that of the good thief. /  Bending low beneath the standard of the King, / I whisper to the darkness, / “I believe” (Sisters of Carmel, 2019).

Jesus & Mary by Jennie Price (2018)

Links of interest…  Be a pilgrim…  Communications for the Parish…  Fifteen ways Jesus Christ suffered in love…  Franciscan Mission Associates: contact / devotional saintslight a candle / prayer requests / quarterly newsletter / saint & prayer of the month / who we are…  Majesty of Christ crucified…  Prayer before a crucifix…  Ram Dass: Dying before you die / horrible beauty of suffering…  Relics from the crucifixion…  Roaring lion, mourning dove, word of God…  Signs & symbols…  Stations: about /  devotion / fish eaters / for families (more) / for kids (coloring pages) / how to do / Jesuitsmaking them worthwhile / on your block / origin / prayers / printables / puppet show / scriptural / significance /  uncomfortable truthway of the cross…  Ten lessons from the agony in the garden…  Via Crucis at the Colosseum with Pope Francis…  Videos: street stations for commuters & bikers….  Way of the cross (preview)…  What it means to worship a man crucified as a criminal & Jesus saw from the cross…  Why pray the stations of the cross…  the Word among us

WP posts…  Capuchin church stations…  Christ’s passion…  For all time…  Full circle…  God’s lovely gifts…  Growing pains…  Lady of sorrows…  Lenten meditations…  Lenten reflections…  Lenten resources…  Lingering memory…  Our Lady star…  Prayerful ways…  Quiet prayer time…  Repeated prayers…  Sioux chapel stations…  Sorrowful redemption…  St. Benedict’s…  St. Jude chapel…  Three visits…  Undeniable familiarity…  Unexpected detours…  Welcoming spirit

Remembrances

Since our monthly Saturday meeting in McAllen was rescheduled, attending four o’clock Mass at Our Lady of Sorrows was out of the question.  We needed another plan, so we opted for church closer to home.

For two days I vacillated between St. Benedict’s in San Benito and Our Lady Star of the Sea in Port Isabel.  Both are very special to us, very welcoming.  But I finally gave in to the gentle though insistent nudge from the voice within.

St. Benedict’s

Walking to our usual spot— fourth pew on the left— we quickly noticed a rather large frame topped with a floppy black bow with a large wreath beside it next to the ambo.

“Someone died,” I whispered to Steven.  “Is it a priest or a deacon?”

Once seated, I leaned forward and quietly asked the woman in the third pew who the man was.

“Fr. Nacho, our former priest, died March fifteenth,” the woman replied.  “He was with us sixteen years.  And then Fr. Tinajero took his place.”

I thanked the woman, sat back on the pew, and told Steven he’d been correct.

Remembrances

We’d been to St. Benedict’s two or three times when Fr. Nacho had celebrated Mass in Fr. Tinajero’s absence, so we’d delighted in his fatherly love: anecdotal homilies oozing with gentle wisdom, self-deprecating humor, and genuine engagement.  He loved his sheep, and they responded accordingly.  What a gift to witness their interactions.

Fr. Nacho had a positive outlook on life.  When he spoke about his mortality and his physical limitations, we chuckled.  Many even laughed out loud.  He was undaunted, down-to-earth funny, and gratefully aware that God was in charge.

Naturally, we were saddened to learn of his passing.  But, mostly, we were glad to have known him, even if just for a little while, so we could remember him with his flock.

       

     

       

       

           

Prayers

Daily prayer for the dead…  Immortal God. holy lord, father and protector of all you have created, we raise our hearts to you today for those who have passed out of this mortal life.

For all the faithful who have died we pray but, in particular, for those dear to us: parents, relatives, friends.  Nor do we forget all who did good to us while on earth and who helped us by their prayers, sacrifice, and example.  We pray also for any who may have done us harm and who stand in special need of your forgiveness.

May the merits and prayers of our virgin mother, Mary, and those of all your angels and saints speak for us and assist them now.  This we ask in Christ’s name.  Amen.

For the faithful departed…  Give them eternal rest, O Lord, and let them share your glory.

God, our creator and redeemer, by your power Christ conquered death and returned to you in glory.  May all your people who have gone before us in faith share his victory and enjoy the vision of your glory forever where Christ lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, forever and ever.  Amen.

You are, O God, the creator and savior of all the faithful.  Forgive your servants all their sins and, by our loving prayers, grant them the pardon they always hoped for.  You live and reign forever in union with the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

For a priest…  God of mercy, we who receive the sacraments of salvation pray for [name], your servant and priest.  You made him a minister of your mysteries on earth.  May he rejoice in the full knowledge of your truth in heaven.  We ask this through Christ, our lord.  Amen.

Quotes

Happy are those who die in the Lord.  Happy indeed the Spirit says; now they can rest forever from their work (Revelations 14:13).

In meadows of green grass he lets me lie.  To the waters of repose he leader me: There he revives my soul (Psalm 23:2).

“What eye has not seen and ear has not heard, what has not entered the human heart [is] what God has prepared for those who love him” (1 Corinthians 2:9).

Contact information

Prayers and quotes are from Let Us Pray for Our Faithful Departed (B-11/12) and Twelve Days of Prayer for Your Faithful Departed (B-16/07) from Franciscan Mission Associates, P.O. Box 598, Mount Vernon, NY 10551-0598.

                

April 5, 2019

Death— whether one of many deaths to the false self or our final physical dying— is simply returning to our spacious ground of being, to our foundation in love.  Life doesn’t truly end; it simply changes form and continues evolving into ever new shapes and beauty (Richard Rohr, OFM).

Eternal rest grant unto him, O Lord, and let perpetual light shine upon him.
May Fr. Nacho rest in peace.

Links of interest…  Benedictine benedictions…  Church in San Benito, TX: facebookMass times (more) / website…   Commending the soul to God…  Immeasurable charity of praying for the dead…  Liberating power of the St. Benedict medal (spiritual weapons)…  Making the case for fraternal correction…  Prayers: book /  death & dying / for holy soulsthe deceased – those in purgatory – when one fears death / meditations / more…  Praying the stations of the cross while mourning a loved one’s death…  St. Benedict: medal (braceletjubilee – more – seven things to know) / memorial / prayers: litany – novena – prayers (more)…  Turn mourning into joy

WP posts…  Call of service…  Lady of sorrows…  Lingering memory…  Mourning joy…  Our Lady’s snow…  Pilgrim’s journey…  Prayerful messages…  St. Benedict’s

Our Lady’s snow

To avoid the colder, rainier drive to church on Friday, Steven and I attended six-thirty Mass at St. Benedict’s Thursday evening.

Fr. Luis and Deacon Sanchez wore white and blue in honor of Our Lady’s feast day, and the Advent altar was simple yet elegant.  The building was somewhat cold, so everyone kept their coat on.  And some coughed in response to the incense, but everyone was focused on the special celebration.

Feeling oh-so blessed during Mass, I closed my eyes without thinking and asked special blessings for everyone during the prayers of the faithful.  They love their church so much! I thought.  Fr. Luis interacts with them so genuinely that they truly are family.

Moreover, parishioners at St. Benedict’s are among the friendliest we’ve been around.  Welcoming and inclusive, they smile when they shake hands and, after Mass, engage us in conversation; so I keep them in my thoughts and prayers between visits.

            

                

Watchfulness

After Mass, Fr. Luis cautioned everyone to be very careful exiting church.  “The steps are slippery.  We will be fixing that problem in a few weeks; but, for now, watch yourself!  And drive safely!”

I couldn’t get to the vehicle quickly enough!  Cold, wet, all I could think of was getting home.  And, sure, the possibility of snow was on my mind, but really?  That’s just wishful thinking, I told myself.  Besides, it’s not even Christmas.

Traffic was heavy for a Thursday night.  Everyone was driving too fast despite the rain, but soon enough we were home safe watching the weathercast on the news.

Our Lady’s snow

Between twelve-o-five and one a.m. I started hearing noises: some, loud on the roof; others, “ticking” sounds on the window panes.  Raindrops?  Sleet?  It’s too dark to see anything.  I may regret not having looked, but I’m off to bed.  It was one-forty-five.

Then, five minutes to nine, Steven woke me.  “It’s snowing!  I figured you’d want to see!”

Those of us familiar with Our Lady of the Snows know that the Rio Grande Valley does not have a shrine in her honor.  However, on the Blessed Mother’s very special day, we were gifted with a fantastic surprise— a miracle, really— Our Lady’s snow.

            

            

           

            

Prayers

Allow me to praise you, O most holy Virgin Mary, with my personal commitment and sacrifice.  Allow me to live, work, suffer, be consumed and die for you, just for you.  Allow me to bring the whole world to you.  Allow me to contribute to your ever-greater exaltation, to your greatest possible exaltation.  Allow me to give you such glory that no one else has ever given up to now.

Allow others to surpass me in zeal for your exaltation and me to surpass them so that, by means of such noble rivalry, your glory may increase ever more profoundly, ever more rapidly, ever more intensely as He who has exalted you so indescribably, above all other beings….  Amen.

O most Holy Virgin, immaculate in body and spirit, look kindly on me as I implore your powerful intercession.  O most Holy Mother, receive my prayers as I present them to God.  (State your petition.)  O Mary, mother of Jesus and our mother, you intercede for us with your son.  O Mary, conceived without sin, pray for us who have recourse to thee.  Amen.

December 9, 2017

“The knowledge that God gives us of the Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin should cause us to glorify him eternally for this masterpiece of his omnipotence in a nature that is purely human” (St. Louise de Marillac).

Seeing how so many Christians express their affection for the Virgin Mary, surely you also feel more a part of the Church, closer to those brothers and sisters of yours.  It is like a family reunion.  Grown-up children, whom life has separated, come back to their mother for some family anniversary.  And even if they have not always got on well together, today things are different; they feel united, sharing the same affection (St. JosémarÍa Escrivá in Christ is passing by, 139).

Seek God in the depths of your pure, clean heart; in the depths of your soul when you are faithful to him.  And never lose that intimacy.

And, if ever you do not know how to speak to him or what to say, or you do not dare to look for Jesus inside yourself, turn to Mary, tota pulchra, all pure and wonderful, and tell her: Our Lady and Mother, the Lord wanted you yourself to look after God and tend him with your own hands.  Teach me, teach us all, how to treat your Son! (St. JosémarÍa Escrivá in The Forge, 84).

Links of interest…  Brownsville Herald: snow forecast / South Texas gets a rare snowfall…  Holy days of obligation are also days of opportunity…  Immaculate Conception: 8 things to know / Dec 8 (more) / feast (more – prayer) / in scripture (discussion – more) / meaning of the celebrationoctave no longer observedprayers / solemnity (more – prayer – readings) / why Catholics believe…  Our Lady of the Snows: about / Aug 5miracleshrine / story (video)…  Sabbatical for suffering with the Immaculate Conception…  St. Benedict Church: facebook / Mass times (more) / website…  St. JosémarÍa Escrivá: fifteen leadership lessonsOpus Dei…  White Christmas in Brownsville, TX (2004)…  Why Mary is patroness of the United States

WP posts…  Faces of Mary…  Fatima prayers…  Lady of sorrows…  Lingering memory…  Lourdes novenas…  Marian devotions…  Mary’s Immaculate Heart…  Mary’s miraculous medal…  Mary’s seven joys…  May flowers…  Our Lady…  Remembrances…  St. Benedict’s…  St. Mary revisited

St. Benedict’s

Steven and I ended up at St. Benedict’s by chance the morning of June 11, 2017.  That is, we’d hoped to attend ten o’clock Mass at Immaculate Heart of Mary in Harlingen and had even shown up early.  But, on entering, we’d found the church empty.

Oh! I thought.  We have the church all to ourselves!  How often does this happen?  I can take all the photos I want and not bother anyone!

We had no reason to think— no way of knowing, really— that Sunday’s English Masses at ten and twelve had been consolidated until the sacristan informed us about eleven-thirty Mass.

Patsy’s worst fear came true! I thought, vividly recalling our first conversation, February twenty-sixth, when we’d met after ten o’clock Mass.  She was concerned that dwindling numbers at the Masses would mean trouble for her church, and now this?  I need to contact her to learn more!

Change of plans

Since we had a commitment three hours away, we couldn’t wait around; so I suggested Mass in San Benito.

Decades ago (in another lifetime) I’d attended an all-day catechist’s conference at
St. Benedict’s, so Steven googled Mass times on his cell phone.

“If we leave right now, we can make it to eleven o’clock Mass,” Steven said, hoping to hurry me up.

“Just three more photos,” I declared, refusing to be rushed.  And then we were off on another of our impromptu adventures.

St. Benedict’s

We arrived with time to spare and, as I took photos here and there outdoors, Steven was warmly greeted by a very nice man— an usher or the sacristan, perhaps?

“Thank you for visiting St. Benedict’s this morning!” he smiled as he made his way into church even before nine-thirty Mass ended.

Then a welcoming woman approached.

Josie told us about “the many roles” she fulfills within the parish besides serving on the finance council, and she shared the church community’s present goals to make renovations and replace the broken stained-glass windows.  But what impressed me most was the unspoken manner through which she glowingly promoted St. Benedict’s.

                

            

            

                

          

      

      

                  

         

            

            

      

September 9, 2017

From the moment I first entered St. Benedict’s, cake came to mind— not just any kind of cake, but the yummy-white sheet cake with the delicious plain-white frosting.  The gold standard as per my taste buds!  The church is so impeccably maintained that its goodness made me long for more, so we returned for five o’clock Mass.

We’d barely crossed the street from the parking lot when a tall priest smiled a curious but enthusiastic “hello” as he briskly made his way from church to the rectory.

Very nice! I thought.  He knows we’re not part of his flock, but he welcomed us warmly nonetheless.  How inclusive!

Then, on passing through the tiny foyer into the nave, we were greeted by a sweet, cherubic woman handing out missals for Mass.

“I don’t need one— I’ve got the Word among us— but he does,” I smiled, motioning to Steven behind me.

We took our usual place— center aisle seat, fifth pew on the left— and knelt to pray before I got up to photograph the altar and the windows, since the one in the back was no longer boarded up.

Once I was back near the entrance, the joyful greeter took a free moment to comment on the newly restored stained-glass windows and added that “the statues are next, in case you don’t see them the next time you visit.”

By the time we left St. Benedict’s that evening, Steven and I had met seven lovely parishioners, starting with Janie Corona.  The two ladies in the pew behind us, lively and inquisitive, engaged Steven about the metal crosses on his belt while I retook photos of the stained-glass windows.  A couple, Simon and Delia who’d occupied one of the front pews, delighted us with neighborly conversation before departing for home.  Then Fr. Tinajero, chatting with his flock, took a few minutes to meet us before Henry, proud son of Deacon Juan Manuel Sanchez, introduced his dad and spoke with us like friends visiting his house on a Sunday afternoon.

As we turned to leave, I saw Janie standing with a friend.  Only this time she held some colorful posters.

“Take one,” she insisted.  “It’s for our fall festival, October seventh and eighth.”

“I’ll tell you what.  Let me photograph it for my ‘St. Benedict’s’ post so that others can read it and hopefully attend.”

Janie and her friend smiled and thanked us.  But, really?  Even as we walked away and then drove past, we were the grateful ones for having been so graciously accepted into their church community that evening.

                

            

            

            

        

            

         

                

November 4, 2017

What a delightful greeting as we walked into church!

To be engaged in brief yet meaningful exchanges on entering was refreshing, but to be hugged by the deacon’s wife— “the mother of St. Benedict’s,” I later told Steven— was sweet, sincere, and exactly what St. Benedict’s is all about: Family, acceptance, unity.

Tencha Sanchez and her partner set the tone for Mass as they greeted parishioners by name and handed out missals.  Then, on seeing a high-school aged young woman, Tencha gently probed, “I haven’t seen you at Mass lately.”

Just as quickly, the girl smiled, undaunted.  “That’s because I’ve been attending Sunday morning Mass with my mom.”

“Okay,” Tencha twinkled on hearing that the young woman takes Mass seriously.

Next I noticed a small woman beaming brightly from the last pew not three feet away.

Janie Corona! 

We hugged hello before I asked about the church carnival.

“We doubled what we earned the year before!” Janie eagerly shared.

I was so happy that I hugged her again.  I knew that they had all come together to achieve that lofty goal.

Then, later as we departed?  A heartfelt despedida, of course!  An open invitation for Mass again soon and a loving hug that only “the mother of St. Benedict’s” could bestow.

                

         

December 10, 2017

                

                

            

September 23, 2018

Since rain was anticipated and driving to Port Isabel would be a much longer trek, we decided on eleven o’clock Mass at St. Benedict’s instead.  Much to our disappointment, however, all the parking spaces were filled when we arrived.

“Looks like we’re late,” Steven said.

Sure enough, when he got down to check, our suspicions were confirmed.  Masses are now at eight, ten, and twelve— not at eleven.  (Alas, I’d checked an old bulletin and DiscoverMass for the Sunday schedule, but not the church website.)

“What now?” Steven asked.

The gray clouds had cleared, and the sun was out.  The long drive was way more appealing than the hour-and-fifteen-minute wait, so off we went.

                

Prayer to St. Benedict

Admirable saint and doctor of humility, you practiced what you taught, assiduously praying for God’s glory and lovingly fulfilling all work for God and the benefit of all human beings.  You know the many physical dangers that surround us today often caused or occasioned by human inventions.  Guard us against poisoning of the body as well as of mind and soul and thus be truly a blessed one for us.  Amen.

        

Quotes

The eleventh degree of humility in the Rule of Benedict treats a situation like this quite specifically.  “Do only those things sanctioned by the community,” the sixth-century document reads.  Take counsel.  Listen.  Seek direction.  While moving ahead stay close to the kind of counsel that has strengthened the community in the past.  Stay close to the spiritual well whose life-giving water has brought you to this point.  The value of this saying is immeasurable.  It is much more than an exciting new answer, the effects of which no one knows.  It is a reaffirmation of spirituality based in experience, grounded in the wisdom of the elders, and rooted in self-control (Joan Chittister in In God’s Holy Light: Wisdom from the Desert Monastics).

O gracious and holy Father, give us wisdom to perceive you, diligence to seek you, patience to wait for you, eyes to behold you, a heart to meditate upon you, and a life to proclaim you through the power of the spirit of Jesus Christ, our lord (St. Benedict).

Links of interest…  Angels & Saints at Ephesus…  Applying St. Benedict’s rule to families…  Benedict option for today / not for me…  Benedictine benedictions…  Church in San Benito, TX: facebook / Mass times (more) / website…  Escrivá Option: An alternative to the Benedict Option…  Fifty years later – the influence of Benedictine monks & nuns…  Humility rules: St. Benedict’s twelve step guide to genuine self-esteem…  Key to avoiding distraction…  Liberating power of the St. Benedict medal (spiritual weapons)…  Making the case for fraternal correction…  Sisters of St. Benedict: dome blog / facebook / gift shop & bakery / website…  St. Benedict (index) / about (more) / college / July 11medal (bracelet – jubilee – more – seven things to know) / monastic innovatormemorial / prayers: litany – novena – prayers (more) / video (based on book – writings of Rafael) / rule / ten helpful quotes / tips on preparing mealswho is (more)…  Tough conversations: Hard choices, staying on the path…  What does a wise old abbot know about a good love story

WP posts…  Budding relationships…  Church doctors…  Kindred acorns…  Mary’s Immaculate Heart…  Our Lady’s snow…  Pink divinity…  Remembrances…  San Giuseppe…  Sensory overload…  Unexpected detours